Zahir

Stainless steel (marine grade 316)
Limited edition of 3
Approx 1.4m diameter

Zahir is developed from the complex geometries of the Rhombic Triacontahedron – based on the repetition of the rhombus – which is itself in proportion to the Golden Ratio. The traditional Islamic motif has undergone an orthographic extrapolation to offer the illusion of the cubes within the structure. The Motif originates from the Great Mosque of Cordoba, Spain AD 784. Moorhouse reworks these two dimension forms found in the mosques tiling and engraving and reworks this into a three dimensional form retaining the harmony and balance of the original designs, with the resulting spherical form offering and endless geometric tessellation.

Ayla

Stainless steel – marine grade 316
Height: 1.8m width: 1.75m depth: 0.5m
Limited edition of 8

Ayla by Pete Moorhouse

Ayla interprets traditional Islamic art in contemporary sculptural form. A geometrically complex sculpture containing 48 facets forming a closed ring – a infinite geometric array of the motif. Ayla contains both the traditional Islamic and western artistic canon within its aesthetic structure.

Arabesque

Arabesque
Stainless steel
2.4m height
Edition of 8

Arabesque

This sculpture reinterprets traditional Islamic geometric design in contemporary sculptural form. The geometric patterns in Islamic art were generally two dimensional (tiles, mosaics, engraving etc) or architectural. This work explores how these designs could be represented three dimensionally as a sculpture.

The pattern is taken from the Huand Hatun mosque in Kayseri, Turkey and would have originated approx in 1200AD. The geometric lattice as it is constructed of the repetition of the square motif and I have based the sculptural form on the cube repetition.  Inspiration also came from The Bibi Khanum mosque, Samarkand, Uzbekistan which has a strong decorative feature of mosaic towering squares on the entrance wall.

The work is also intended to give a sense of balance and harmony, being delicate but strong, supporting and being supported – rising – celebrating spiritual aspiration.

The work can be illuminated at night with light fitting position.

Hala

Hala – Halo around the moon
Stainless steel
1.5m diameter
Edition of 8
2m diameter edition of 3

Hala ( Halo around the moon)

This sculpture reinterprets Islamic geometric design in contemporary sculptural form. The geometric patterns found in traditional Islamic art are generally two dimensional (tiles, mosaics, engraving etc.) or architectural and this sculpture reworks the traditional motifs into sculptural form. The majority of geometric patterns in Islamic art are based on the repetition of a single motif, which is designed in such a way that all the recurring components fit together in a perfect sequence. The essence of this work is the creation of a never ending repeated pattern – an infinite geometric continuation. In the Arabic world the geometric patterns were not seen are merely abstract but as being imbued with sacred content of both metaphysical and religious significance. This sculpture in this way lends itself to a variety of philosophical interpretations.

The individual stainless steel panels catch and reflect the sunlight, and dance around the sculpture as the observer moves around the work, highlighting the paths and ongoing connections. This sculpture is fabricated from 316 Marine grade stainless steel.

Sama

Sama
Stainless steel
2m
Edition of 8

This sculpture reinterprets Islamic geometric design in contemporary sculptural form. The geometric patterns found in traditional Islamic art are generally two dimensional (tiles, mosaics, engraving etc) or architectural and this sculpture reworks the traditional motifs into sculptural form. The majority of geometric patterns in Islamic art are based on the repetition of a single motif, which is designed in such a way that all the recurring components fit together in a perfect sequence. The essence of this work is the creation of a rising repeated pattern. In the Arabic world the geometric patterns were not seen are merely abstract but as being imbued with sacred content of both metaphysical and religious significance. This sculpture in this way lends itself to a variety of philosophical interpretations.

The work is also intended to give a sense of balance and harmony, being delicate but strong, supporting and being supported – rising – celebrating spiritual aspiration.

The work also draws on the similarities between the western minimalist movement and traditional Islamic art – the seriality, repetition and attention to line and form which all have much in common.

This sculpture is fabricated from 316 Marine grade stainless steel and the individual panels catch and reflect the sunlight .The light dances around the sculpture as the observer moves around the work, highlighting the paths and ongoing connections. The work can also be illuminated at night, both internally and externally.

Arabesque (Colour)

Arabesque Colour Edition
Stainless steel, paint
2.4m height
Edition of 8

Arabesque

Available in turquoise blue and azure blue – two traditional colours found in traditional Islamic art and tile-work.

This sculpture reinterprets traditional Islamic geometric design in contemporary sculptural form. The geometric patterns in Islamic art were generally two dimensional (tiles, mosaics, engraving etc) or architectural. This work explores how these designs could be represented three dimensionally as a sculpture.

The pattern is taken from the Huand Hatun mosque in Kayseri, Turkey and would have originated approx in 1200AD. The geometric lattice as it is constructed of the repetition of the square motif and I have based the sculptural form on the cube repetition.  Inspiration also came from The Bibi Khanum mosque, Samarkand, Uzbekistan which has a strong decorative feature of mosaic towering squares on the entrance wall.

The work is also intended to give a sense of balance and harmony, being delicate but strong, supporting and being supported – rising – celebrating spiritual aspiration.

Both turquoise and azure blue are widely used within Islamic art. In Iran cobalt and copper were abundant natural resources which had a significant role in their utilization for tiling, and over time, turquoise and azure have gained spiritual association.

Turquoise and azure were popular with the ancient Persians. They had a special interest in precious and rare stones, and gave them high value. This can be seen clearly in numerous examples over thousands of years. Undoubtedly, the reason for this interest is beautiful and
shining colors of these stones in nature that attract every viewer. Among these stones, turquoise and azure have been found more than others in Iranian plateau. That is why turquoise blue and azure blue have been named after these two stones.

The work can be illuminated at night with light fitting position.

Aspora

Aspora
Stainless steel
6m Edition of 3
2m Edition of 8

Aspora

The sculpture is a celebration of life. Celebrating plant forms and the cycle of new growth and regeneration. The overall form represents a leaf. Seeds, spores or pollen could be seen to be represented by the negative spaces – their presence suggested by their absence – gone in the wind to create new growth.

The geometric form of the sculpture and the elegant curves reference Islamic art traditions. The Islamic geometric patterns were inspired by forms found in nature – plant forms, petal arrangements etc. Extending this theme further, the skeleton vein pattern of a leaf have been replaced with an Islamic geometric pattern. This particular pattern originates from the Huand Hatun mosque in Kayseri, Turkey and would have originated approx. in 1200AD. This connection of the sculpture with another part of the world is a reminder that all life on earth is connected in one eco system.

The work is also intended to give a sense of balance and harmony, being delicate but strong, supporting and being supported – rising – celebrating life. The sculpture is contemporary but it is intended that the juxtaposition of modern art in the garden envirnment is sympathetic. It is hoped and that the sculpture draws ones eye inviting a closer inspection.

The name Aspora is formed by combining the ancient Greek words spora (spores) and diaspora (scattering/ dispersion).

Nafassa

Stainless steel – marine grade 316
2.5m height
Limited edition of 8

Aurora

Aurora
Stainless steel
2.4m height
Edition of 8

Aurora

This sculpture combines themes found in Islamic Art – the symmetries found in nature and in the geometric motifs found in the tiling, engraving and architecture of mosques. This work is a celebration of life – a celebration of light which supports and sustains life. The wave forms can be interpreted in different ways – they are light waves symbolising the journey of light from the sum to earth – an 8 second journey – their origin being so far away but being all around us. The waves make a connection between earth and the cosmos reaching upwards towards the sun.

Contained within the mesh of waves is the essence that supports existence. Oscillating between night and day light etches the horizons of life. Light is an intrinsic influence on all our souls and we respond to light in our own individual way. Light supports life with equal benevolence and is seen as a symbol of hope. Light goes beyond the skin, travelling deeper into us, transforming us.

Light allows us to see what is there and also the potential of what might be.

The sculpture allows for other interpretations. The form could be seen to be waves connecting with ocean – patterns created by sunlight reflecting in water or they could be waves created in the sand being blown by wind creating rippling waves in the dunes.

The sculpture is intended to be illuminated at night –adding another dimension to the work.

Aspire

Aspire
Steel
2m height
Edition of 3

This sculpture reinterprets Islamic geometric design in contemporary sculptural form. The geometric patterns found in traditional Islamic art are generally two dimensional (tiles, mosaics, engraving etc.) or architectural and this sculpture reworks the traditional motifs into sculptural form. It pays tribute to the geometric design process – the line drawings originally done on parchment with ruler and compass – in the sculpture the lines are extended – highlighting this design method used in ancient times. The majority of geometric patterns in Islamic art are based on the repetition of a single motif, which is designed in such a way that all the recurring components fit together in a perfect sequence. The essence of this work is the creation of the sculpture with the repeated pattern and they way these ’tiles’ interact as the viewer moves around the sculpture. In the Arabic world the geometric patterns were not seen are merely abstract but as being imbued with sacred content of both metaphysical and religious significance. This sculpture in this way lends itself to a variety of philosophical interpretations.

The work is also intended to give a sense of balance and harmony, being delicate but strong, supporting and being supported – rising – celebrating spiritual aspiration.

The work also draws on the similarities between the western minimalist movement and traditional Islamic art – the seriality, repetition and attention to line and form which all have much in common with each other.

This sculpture is fabricated from steel that has attained it natural patina – but is also available in other steels. The work can be illuminated at night with a light fitting position.